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General Article

Taking Good Care of Your Dog

Taking Good Care of Your Dog

You dog has a personality just as you do and many of the same emotions and feelings. For example, dogs get bored, frustrated, excited, happy and sad. It’s really important that you treat your dog as you would like to be treated were you in their place. With love and attention your dog will reward you with so much companionship in return. Knowing that you are taking care of your pet well and creating happiness is extremely rewarding in itself.

If you own a dog you own a responsibility. This responsibility is to make time in your day, no matter how busy, in order to provide what it needs. This can be anything from play time to walking to keeping its meals healthy and varied. All pets can suffer just as we do so make sure you are creating a great environment for your dog to enjoy.

This is especially true if your dog is left unattended for long periods each day while you are at work. Dogs are naturally sociable creatures and they will certainly find isolation hard to cope with for extended periods. It can also become very boring for a dog to spend its life in just a few rooms of the house or a small back garden without a daily release such as an evening walk.

Could you imagine yourself sitting in room for 8 hours with no TV, magazines or books and nothing to occupy your mind? You would get pretty bored pretty fast and this is how you must see things from your pets perspective. Make their life enjoyable!

Aside from love and caring the thing your dog will appreciate most is walking on a daily basis and play. Playing is actually the fastest way to bond with a dog. By doing the simple things right you’ll be giving your dog a happy life rather than one where its needs have been forgotten.…

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Pet Adoption

A Guide to Crate Training Your Lovable Puppy

House training a new puppy is a job all new dog owners must face. One tried and true method commonly used is crate training. Despite what you may hear or believe keeping the dog in a crate is neither punishment nor mean. Dog crates provide a safe haven for the puppy to retreat and curl up when adjusting to its new surroundings, a quiet place to lie down and sleep, or somewhere the dog can relax and be left home alone. For many dogs, their crate is their own little home.
When a puppy is safely in its crate, you can be sure that it won’t be able to chew anything the furniture, hurt itself, or possibly put itself in a dangerous situation where it can seriously hurt itself. Dog crates also speed up the housebreaking training. However, it is important that you never use the crate for punishment. Your goal is to make the crate a place for the dog to feel safe and protected.
Many crates come with multiple partitions which allow you to alter the space the dog has available for itself as it grows. Add some soft bedding to the floor of the crate so the puppy has somewhere comfortable and warm to lie. It is important to understand that puppies have small bladder capacities so accidents will happen. Never punish the dog if it does have an accident. You’ll do more harm to the training than good.
Try to have the dog sleep in its crate from first day. It will only be a matter of time before the dog begins to go in on its own when its wants to be alone or take a nap. Many dog owners keep the crates in rooms which are situated around the family at all times, like the kitchen or family room. Take the crate introduction slowly and never force the dog into it. Try coxing it into the crate with either a tasty treat or a fun toy. At first, the dog may be uncertain but keep up with the positive encouragement. Praise it and make a huge fuss when it does go into the dog crate.
The dog should be kept in its crate all night. Don’t feed it or give it any water too late in the day. Sometimes dog owners will keep the crate to their bedroom at night. They worry that the dog might be lonely through the night. Also they feel they can hear the dog better if it needs to go out.…

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General Article

Grooming Items That Are Essential for Your Dog

Grooming Items That Are Essential for Your Dog

Although the thought of caring for man’s best friend can be an exciting one, it is important that you also take into consideration, the fact that you have a lot of new responsibilities in your hands. You have to bathe him, walk him, exercise him and overall just take care of him so that he is always in the peak of health and is always a happy dog. One area which is especially important when it comes to taking care of your dog is grooming. Although bathing and grooming are always thought to go together, grooming really happens after the bath and entails separate activities too.

In order to make sure that your dog is well groomed there are a couple of important items that you are going to want to make sure are available for him. These will help make the task of grooming easier, not just for him but for you as well.

• Brushes and combs – If you are a person with hair that has its bad days then you are no stranger to the tangles. It can be difficult to keep your hair in check, especially if you don’t have the right brush or comb for the job. This doesn’t just apply to you, it applies to your dog as well. If you have a head of hair, your dog has a whole body of hair or fur. That means, just like you, your dog has to have the right comb or brush to ensure that he avoids the tangles. Frequent brushing can keep your dog happy because matted hair can be painful. At the same time it can harbor fleas and dirt too. A brush can help get out all the tangles and a comb can help keep fur nice and smooth. It can also help to remove fleas.

• Nail shears – One of the most important areas on your dog’s body is their feet. Although you may consider buying your dog shoes and though this may be a great investment, not all pet owners like the thought of their dogs in clothing. Whether you buy them shoes or not however, it is still important to make sure you cut their nails. The benefits are both for you and your dog. If your dog is extremely active, and you play with him a lot, you can get scratched with long nails. In the case of your dog, long nails can end up getting stuck in flooring cracks and can cause him pain when he tries to scratch himself.

• Oil – Oil is one of the best ways to clean a human’s ear and this works for dogs as well. You can get special instruments to help clean your dog’s ears or if you want to take the easy route, you can get a vet to do the cleaning for you. Whatever the case, your dog will be much happier for it.

• Dental care – There are plenty of ways to care for a dog’s teeth including their own toothbrush or dental sticks. Make sure you use dog friendly products for this though and ask a vet for help.

Grooming is just as important for dogs as it is for humans. Keep your dog happy with the items mentioned above.…

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General Article

Dog Care – Inflammation of the Brain

Dog Care – Inflammation of the Brain

Under this general heading can be grouped encephalitis, meningitis, the involvement of the brain during uraemia and advanced kidney diseases, acute toxaemia, and so on.

The symptoms may come suddenly as with a fit, or may appear gradually. Although the animal seems conscious he is, for the most part, more or less oblivious of his surroundings although there may be occasional periods of comparative lucidity.

He does not recognise his owners, although he will react to food and sometimes to loud noises. In mild cases the dog tends to wander about aimlessly and restlessly with a vacant expression; in more serious cases he will walk round in small circles, always in the same direction and, if restrained, will struggle to continue this circling. Violent cases will try to climb the wall and bump into obstacles. Often the dog will cry, whine or howl, and the high-pitched typical meningeal yelp is a very distressing and ominous symptom.

Little can be done by the owner. Pending arrival of the veterinary surgeon, the dog should be given a sedative or Chlorbutol (from three grains upwards) and put in a darkened, empty room or a large kennel where he cannot injure himself. Ice packs or cloths wrung out in very cold water are often useful when applied to the back of the skull during a quiet period.

Except in very mild cases the prognosis of this condition is extremely unfavourable, and where permanent damage to the brain exists recovery is impossible; it is kinder to have the animal put to sleep. The veterinary surgeon should be asked his frank opinion of the dog’s chances. He should always be consulted immediately whenever the brain is involved.

If treatment is to be tried, such as general anaesthesia for some hours to rest the brain or powerful sedatives, the sooner it is begun the better. As it can be provided only by a qualified person, one should be consulted without delay.

Bruising Bruises come from a variety of causes, but doubtless the commonest is an argument between dog and motorcar. Whilst bruising is not likely to produce more than a temporary stiffness in a young dog, in old ones neglected bruising may leave a chronic myositis (a type of rheumatism). In addition, with severe cases of bruising in old dogs, the histamine-like products released from the damaged tissues may produce kidney embarrassment or some degree of shock.

The injured area should first be searched for any minor cuts or grazes. These should be bathed and cleansed with a little warm antiseptic solution. Warm compresses to the bruised area will greatly relieve the local pain. A hot water-bottle, a warmed pad of Ther-mogene wool or a kaolin poultice provide the local heat required.

A little warm water by mouth with glucose added is advisable as a mild stimulant, and if the bruising is extensive, and as a routine with old dogs, it is wise to give a little bicarbonate of soda every two or three hours until about twelve hours after the injury. This by its alkalising action helps to counteract any acidosis or kidney impairment. According to the size of the dog, A�-1 teaspoonful is adequate, and this amount can quite easily be given dissolved in a little warm water or warm milk.

Limited exercise should be given for 5-7 days following the injury, and diet should be light and preferably fluid. Particularly for old dogs, where the bruising may have been extensive, barley water for a week or so is better than ordinary drinking water.…

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General Article

Taking Care Of Your Dog During The Winter Months

Taking Care Of Your Dog During The Winter Months

With winter just around the corner it is time to give some thought on the steps you can take to keep your dog healthy and safe during the long and cold winter months soon approaching in many parts of the globe.

One hazard to be keenly aware of is antifreeze, it is extremely toxic so care should be taken when pouring it into your car since dogs are drawn to the taste and will not hesitate to lick up any spilled drops. When filling your car with antifreeze check the ground for spills and clean up any that may occur immediately, and of course store antifreeze well out of reach of both children and pets.

Winter walks are both fun and refreshing but road salt is very irritating to dogs’ paws, wiping them with a warm, damp cloth after the walk will be soothing and minimizes the damage that road salt can cause to your dog’s paws. Some dogs have fur growth between the paw pads, trimming it will prevent tiny ice particles from forming and causing discomfort to your dog. While on walks don’t let your dog eat snow, you don’t know what may be in it, and be aware of any frozen ponds, rivers or lakes near by as it may become a danger both to you and your dog.

Grooming your dog often will keep the coat well insulated. Tiny dogs and dogs with short coats may need to be safe guarded from cold temperatures with a sweater, it doesn’t have to be anything fancy, unless of course your dog is fashion conscience, but one that is easy to put on and keeps in warmth will do just fine.

In extremely cold weather limit the time your dog spends outdoors. And as is true in summer, so also in winter, don’t leave your dog in the car.…

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General Article

Caring For a Dog – Keeping Your Dog Safe

Caring For a Dog – Keeping Your Dog Safe

Pets bring so much love to a home and family.  They are more then just a pet; they are an extension of the family.  We love them, care for them, and give protection to them, just like we do with our families.  Caring for a dog is very important to ensure that your pet stays healthy and happy. 

Like humans, dogs need to have plenty of exercise, to keep them fit and healthy.  It keeps them from becoming over weight and helps their muscles, joints and bones stay strong.  Dogs need to have daily exercise to be able to maintain good health.  Going for walks and taking time to play and run with your dog, will keep your dog young and active.  Playing catch or throwing a Frisbee is a great way for you and your dog to keep in shape. 

Giving your dog a good nutritional food will also help in maintaining good health.  It’s never wise to skimp on highly nutritional food for your dog.  When purchasing dog food, always check the labels to see what it contains and how much fillers it might have in it.  Dogs need to have a balance of protein, carbohydrates, fat, vitamins and minerals, to sustain good health. Always have fresh cold water available for your dog at all times.

Keeping your dog safe is another way of showing how much you love your dog.  When they are outside, be sure that they are in a secure safe area.  Always have a collar with a ID tag attached with important information on where to return your dog, if he or she gets lost. Caring for a dog is a rewarding job, with many returns.…

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General Article

How to Properly Train a Puppy When Living in an Apartment

How to Properly Train a Puppy When Living in an Apartment

Are you thinking about adopting a cute puppy? There are a few things to consider before making such an important decision. One of these is where you live. Do you own a home or live in an apartment building? Is your neighborhood or apartment complex dog-friendly? These are all important questions that need to be answered if you want to give your puppy a happy and comfortable home.

Raising a dog isn’t easy. You have to deal with house-training, behavior coaching, and taking care to constantly monitor and prevent any type of damage. Here are some of my personal tips on how to raise a happy and healthy dog when living in an apartment building:

Learn about the dog supplies you’ll need, especially dog crates for potty training. The dog’s crate will be its home in your home. Try to keep it in one place all the time. Most people put their dog’s crate in the busiest rooms of the apartment so the dog is close to someone all the time. The crate will serve as the dog’s place to sleep, relax or simply hang out when it wants some alone time. A dog won’t make a mess where it sleeps so you want to keep it in its crate until you get a potty schedule going with it. Once the dog becomes more comfortable with going outside to do its business, you can allow the dog more and more time outside of the crate.

During the early stages of owning a puppy, it is important that you pay attention to any signs the puppy may be sending. Dogs communicate a great deal through body language. It will let you know when it need to go outside, seems afraid, lonesome, stressed, or wants to play. The dog will respect you more if you give it the care and respect it deserves. By paying attention to its body language you can know full well what your dog wants or needs.

Give the dog plenty of attention and treats for good behaviors. Always reinforce positive behaviors and never dwell on the negatives. It just does more harm than good. You should never ever hit, shout, spank or react with physical violence with the puppy about something it did. The dog doesn’t know it did wrong. You must ignore the negative behavior and the dog won’t probably ever do it again. Raising a puppy takes a good deal of patience and energy.…